Passages Exhibit Field Trip


On Saturday, April 14, 2012 many of us will be traveling to Atlanta to see the Passages Interactive Bible Exhibit, an exhibition of how the Bible has been written, copied, translated, published and distributed throughout history.  This special exhibit of the history of the printed Word of God is in honor of the 400th Anniversary of the King James Version of the Bible (1611) in 2011.

Highlights of the exhibit include: The Jewish Scribe Room, The Christian Scribe Room, European Translations, Gutenberg's Print Shop, Reformation Theatre (reenactments) and Early Reformation Bibles, William Tyndale, Jerome's Cave, Early English Bibles, Correction (how printed versions were corrected), and Adornment (artistic traditions in biblical production).
 

Exodus 6:2-9 The Four (sometimes Five) Cups of Passover

passover sederDuring the course of a traditional Jewish Passover seder there are four cups of wine which are drunk by those present.  Each cup is connected to an aspect of deliverance mentioned by God in Exodus 6:6-7 (Read Exodus 6:2-9 for full context).  Some Jewish groups have a Fifth Cup which is not drunk, it will be drunk when  Messiah comes (cf. Matthew 26:29).

For our Midweek Bible Study we will discuss this passage and it's fulfillment in Jesus Christ.

We will be meeting at the Hayes' House tonight (Tuesday, April 10, 2012).

What Jews Can Learn From the New Testament

There's an interesting, free online for a limited time, article in the recent issue of Biblical Archaeology Review entitled What Jews (and Christians too) Should Know About the New Testament by the popular Jewish scholar, teacher, and author Amy-Jill Levine.  Dr. Levine is an Orthodox Jew who teaches both New Testament and Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University.  She has spent the bulk of her career introducing the New Testament to a Jewish audience and getting Christians and Jews alike to appreciate that the New Testament is fundamentally a collection of Jewish documents intended for a largely Jewish audience and composed by Jewish authors.  This understanding of a common and shared heritage among Jews and Christians in the early centuries of Christianity fosters an environment where both groups can experience a deeper understanding and perhaps growth in spiritual depth from reading and applying the teachings of Jesus, the Apostles and the other New Testament writers.